CIA’s Dark History of Surveillance on its Own People during the Cold War

The Mass Violation of the Civil Liberties of American Citizens

Jules

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Photo by Shahadat Rahman on Unsplash

A massive geopolitical conflict between two Supreme powers, the United States and the Soviet Union- the Cold War lasted for decades. It started at the end of World War II and lasted till 1991, finally ending with the collapse of the Soviet Union.

There were no attacks or bombings included; instead, it was a war of distinctive ideologies to exert power, influence, and control over the enemy. The War shaped foreign policies for the future of the United States and put the people in fear of a potential nuclear war led by communist infiltration.

Central Intelligence Agency — A Blessing in Disguise for the United States?

Photo by FLY:D on Unsplash

During the Cold War, the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) was essential in gathering information and analyzing intelligence on foreign countries. The report was directly provided to the policymakers, which helped them better prepare for anything their enemies could come up with.

CIA solely worked to back the interest of the United States government, mainly consisting of the spread of communism. This involved conducting espionage and sabotage operations that would undermine any threat from a foreign state or government.

Everything worked out well for the United States, but the CIA mostly played a controversial role during the Cold War.

Many international laws, principles of democracy, and human rights constitutions were violated; one of them being the surveillance activities of the CIA that led to the beginning of significant future reforms, such as balancing national security and the individual right to privacy and also led to more vigorous oversight of the actions by the intelligence company.

The Paranoia of Keeping Friends and Enemies Equally Close

United States policymakers and officials partook in most decisions during the Cold…

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Jules

Psychology Expert | MSc Social and Cultural Psychology